Last month, my sister, Rachel Morrison, competed in the 2016 Paralympics in Rio. She won a gold medal and set a world record for her class in discus. My pride in her accomplishment is immeasurable.

For the last six years, my family and I have been present throughout her adversity, pain and moments of triumph like this world record. There have been hospital bills and sleepless nights; bouts of depression and matching tattoos.

What seemed like trivial sporting competitions paved the way for her to compete across the country. Eventually, her closet was full of clothing with “Team USA” emblazoned across the chest.

I would be lying if I said my sister didn’t inspire me. What I have an issue with is when people like my sister are turned into what is negatively referred to as “inspiration porn.”

The term was coined in 2012 by the late Stella Young, an Australian comedian and disability activist. Young’s inspiration porn concept refers to images of people with a disability that have some message of pre-packaged hope or quote placed on top. Words like, “the only disability in life is a bad attitude.”

In 2014, Young gave a TED Talk explaining how these images are inspiration porn.

“They objectify one group of people for the benefit of another group of people,” Young said. “So, in this case, we’re objectifying disabled people for the benefit of non-disabled people. The purpose of these images is to inspire you, to motivate you, so that we can look

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This article excerpt was sourced from the website Google News - Wheelchairs and the original article can be found at My sister is inspiring, but she's not your 'inspiration porn'.