2016-03-21 – CMHR is the first museum in the world to showcase three-dimensional tactile fine art printing developed by 3DPhotoWorks.

Tactile, Kinesthetic and Haptic Feedback Definition:

Tactile Feedback is defined as a type of Haptic Feedback, and is generally divided into two different classes: Kinesthetic and Tacticle. Tactile Feedback means the things you can feel through your sense of touch. Your touch sense provides your brain the ability to feel things such as vibration, pressure, texture etc. Kinesthetic Feedback means the things you can feel from sensors in your muscles, joints, tendons etc. Kinesthetic feedback tells your brain the approximate size of an object, the objects weight, and how you are holding it. Haptic Feedback is defined as a combination of both Tactile and Kinesthetic Feedbacks.

Main Document

Canadian museum presents exhibit that blind people can “see” – Breakthrough technology by U.S. start up 3DPhotoWorks LLC enables the visually impaired to experience art on an equal basis with the sighted.

“The words most frequently used by blind people when they describe this experience are ‘freedom’, ‘independence’ and ‘equality’.”



Feeling lonely or just want to make new friends? Come join the MDM Club for free. Chat in a safe and tolerant space, created especially for the disability community.


Sight Unseen, a major exhibition of fine art photographs by some of the world’s most accomplished blind photographers recently opened at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) in Winnipeg.

CMHR is the first museum in the world to showcase three-dimensional tactile fine art printing developed by 3DPhotoWorks of Chatham, New York. This recently patented technology is considered a major breakthrough for people with vision loss – allowing them to “see” photographs…

Get Disability News In Your Inbox

To read the rest of this article please visit the original post as this is only an excerpt as the original article is currently not available for full republication.

This article excerpt was sourced from the website Disabled World (summary only) and the original article can be found at Sight Unseen - Exhibit That Blind Can "See".

- Advertisement -